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Thread: Trafficking in Persons Report 2008

  1. #1
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    Default Trafficking in Persons Report 2008

    The Trafficking in Person's Report is the most comprehensive worldwide study on the efforts of governments to combat severe forms of trafficking in persons and its assessments are based on material collected from local government and non-government organizations. Ireland was lowered from Tier 1 to Tier 2 status. (Tier 2 is worse than Tier 1 so we do need to improve!)


    IRELAND (Tier 2)

    Ireland is a destination country for women, men, and children trafficked for the purposes of commercial sexual exploitation and forced labor.An academic study by the National University of Ireland Galway and Trinity College concluded that a minimum of 76 victims were trafficked into Ireland for sexual exploitation between 2000 and 2006, and an NGO working with immigrants reported 46 cases of suspected labor trafficking from July 2005 to December 2007. Women from Eastern Europe, Nigeria, other parts of Africa, as well as smaller numbers from South America and Asia, have reportedly been trafficked to Ireland for forced prostitution. Labor trafficking victims reportedly consist of men and women fromBangladesh, Pakistan, Egypt, and the Philippines, although there may also be some victims from South America, Eastern Europe, and other parts of Asia and Africa. An Irish NGO reported that most forced labor victims are found in domestic labor, and restaurant and agricultural work. Unaccompanied minors from various source countries, particularly in Africa, represent a vulnerable group in Ireland that may be susceptible to trafficking and exploitation.

    The Government of Ireland does not fully comply with the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking; however, it is making significant efforts to do so. Irish officials have shown considerable political will in combating human trafficking through the drafting of new anti-trafficking legislation, but key deficiencies in the areas of prosecution, protection, and prevention remain.

    Recommendations for Ireland:

    Enact comprehensive anti-trafficking legislation; establish formal policies and procedures to ensure victims are provided with access to protection and assistance in coordination with anti-trafficking NGOs; and implement a visible trafficking demand-reduction campaign in Ireland.

    Prosecution

    Ireland’s prosecution efforts were hampered by a lack of comprehensive anti-trafficking legislation during the rating period. The government introduced a bill in 2007 that specifically defines and outlaws all forms of human trafficking. Irish officials anticipate the bill’s enactment in June 2008. The Government of Ireland did not report any prosecutions of trafficking offenses or convictions of trafficking offenders in 2007. The Irish police launched Operation Snow in 2007, which was dedicated to investigating the possible trafficking of unaccompanied children into Ireland; it also cooperated with the United Kingdom on antitrafficking investigations. The Irish police instituted a new training module on human trafficking as part of basic training for new police recruits and continuing education for police personnel throughout Ireland.

    Protection

    Lacking a formal mechanism for referring victims to service providers, the Irish government referred victims on a case-by-case basis to NGOs providing food, shelter, health care, and legal assistance. The government employed some formal immigration
    procedures that proactively identify victims among vulnerable groups and guide law enforcement in the process of victim identification. Irish NGOs reported that the government generally treated victims well, but there have been instances in rural areas where police have detained suspected victims to verify identity and for unlawful acts committed as a result of their being trafficked. Immigration authorities can provide victims with permission to remain in Ireland. The government funded IOM to assist with return and reintegration of victims. The government and NGOs reported that the police encourage victims to assist in investigations but do not pressure them to do so. The government did not allocate specific funds for victims of trafficking in Ireland but provided funds for one NGO that works with trafficking victims as part of its broader mission to assist women involved in commercial sexual exploitation.
    The Immigration, Residence, and Protection Bill, currently in the first stages of Parliamentary approval, includes provisions for the protection of trafficking victims.

    Prevention

    Ireland has taken steps to improve prevention efforts. In December 2007, the Justice Ministry created an anti-trafficking unit headed by an executive director who reports directly to the Justice Minister. This unit leads and coordinates overall anti-trafficking efforts for the Government of Ireland. The government has a positive working relationship with NGOs combating trafficking. Government officials distributed and displayed NGO-funded and -developed posters aimed at assisting victims in airports, bus and rail stations, ports, hospitals, and police stations, and a partially government-funded NGO runs a hotline that offers victims and potential victims assistance. Ireland’s Department of Defense includes training modules for peacekeepers that address human trafficking and sexual exploitation. While the government has not implemented a visible trafficking demandreduction campaign in Ireland, it has contributed approximately $438,000 over three years beginning in 2006 to the worldwide ECPAT mission, an NGO combating international child trafficking and child sex tourism worldwide. Ireland has not ratified the 2000 UN TIP Protocol.

  2. #2
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    Question What this means in a short sentence???

    I can't understand the meaning of this thread???
    Can somebody explain the meaning of it in a short sentence, please??
    It is too long to read, I get dizzy & sleepy so I get lost at the end without understanding it??
    Thank you xxx xxx

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    Exclamation re question

    i think it means any ladies r children brought in 2 irelandby force that dont want 2 work in job we do will b in BIG SHIT if caught

    well thats wat i made off tread

    mayb i m wrong but thats wat i picked up in it <hope im correct>

    rachel
    Last edited by lorna123; 05-06-08 at 05:57.

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    Exclamation Report!!

    Basically it's a report into Human trafficking in Ireland, it gives out that Ireland has a poor track record for legislating (making laws) against trafficking but they are improving and by June 2008 they should be in full complience (meet a standard) with European minimum standards.
    At the moment if a person that has been trafficked and found they will be dealt with on an individual basis (no set procedure yet) and given support not Big shit!! The Big shit will be on the people who trafficked them.
    Hope this helps, I can go on like Quaterpounder would LOL but you get the point.

    Just to add I did say at the top that Ireland was improving, that comment was only relating to the laws against trafficking, I did not comment on the fact that Ireland is getting worse for trafficking because Patricia made that bit clear in her comment
    Last edited by anon361; 05-06-08 at 08:35. Reason: extra bit on end

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    Question why worst?

    Why Ireland it is getting worst ??

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sexy naomi View Post
    I can't understand the meaning of this thread???
    Can somebody explain the meaning of it in a short sentence, please??
    Just me posting the text about Ireland from a newly published report on human trafficking here, because I know I'm not the only one here who follows all news they can get regards human trafficking.

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    Default Tier 2!!

    Hi sexy,
    Yes it is getting worse but altough the numbers seem low (76 people in 6 years for sex and 46 in 2 years for labour ) it is still an increase on previous years To me and everyone else (people involved in this trade excluded) 1 person being trafficed for whatever reason is too many . I put Tier 2 in the title because we were Tier 1 and we are now Tier 2 which is worse.

    Just for reference there are 4 Tiers:
    Tier 1
    Tier 2
    Tier 2 Watch List
    Tier 3

    This link shows a selection of countries on Tier 2 or worse, Ireland is not shown because the report is a year old
    http://www.nationmaster.com/red/grap...&b_printable=1
    Last edited by anon361; 05-06-08 at 10:29.

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    Question Tier 2

    I wonder where the Tier 2 people operates from?? I have never meet any of them anywhere.

  9. #9
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    Question Tier's

    Am I part of any tier group???

  10. #10
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    Default

    It’s a pity that Irish Goverment does so much to Aid those abroad, but lets them down when they find themselves here and embrolied in very dark situations, Its Heart is in the right place, but could do more.
    Thanks Anon for shortening that, it is hard to follow in places...

    Ps I don't think Naomi is a part of any tier if your a sailor of your own sea's (IE Totally at liberty to make your own choices)

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