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Thread: Illicit sex

  1. #1
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    Default Illicit sex

    Do men need more extra marital sex now than in the past.

    I see that there were over 300 brothels in Ireland in the 1830's

    Its hadly a new phenomen

    But now much safer than ever in the past from a health point of view and from the prevention of pregnancy.

    Of course it is a convenient money earner, when there is a scarcity of decent jobs all over the world for young people.

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    300 brothels in Ireland in 1830s

    You may have stumbled onto a heretofore unrealised cause of the famine in 1845

    Too much riding not enough minding the fucking spuds

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    They obviously criminalised the client back in the early 1840's and decimated the sex trade- there was no money to feed families and on top of the the potato crop failed for two years because of blight and the rest is history !
    Seek and you shall find!

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    Quote Originally Posted by UB40 View Post
    They obviously criminalised the client back in the early 1840's and decimated the sex trade- there was no money to feed families and on top of the the potato crop failed for two years because of blight and the rest is history !
    Revisionist history or accurate interpretation?

    According to Wikipedia there was 1600 prostitutes working in Monto alone. The attitudes never change though.

    "Monto was the nickname for the one-time red light district in Dublin, the capital of Ireland. Monto was roughly the area bounded by Talbot Street, Amiens Street, Gardiner Street and Seán McDermott Street (formerly Gloucester Street). The name is derived from Montgomery Street (now called Foley Street), which runs parallel to the lower end of Talbot Street towards what is now Connolly Station.[1] It was immortalised as "Nighttown" in the "Circe" chapter of James Joyce's famous work, Ulysses, where the central protagonists Leopold Bloom and Stephen Dedalus together visit a brothel.[1]

    In its heyday from the 1860s - 1920s, there were anything up to 1,600 prostitutes working there at any one time, with all classes of customers catered for. It was reputed to be the biggest red light district in Europe at the time. Its financial viability was aided by the number of British Army barracks and hence soldiers in the city, notably the Royal Barracks (later Collins Barracks and now one of the locations of Ireland's National Museum).[1]

    Monto was also a hive of IRA activity, particularly around the time of the war of independence, with several safe houses for the flying columns which included Phil Shanahan's public house.

    The then Prince of Wales, Prince Albert Edward (later King Edward VII), according to popular legend, lost his virginity there. In the 1880s the Prince, accompanied by his wife Alexandra and their son Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence strolled unrecognised through the area, having slipped away from their bodyguards and walked through Dublin.

    Between 1923 and 1925, religious missions led by Frank Duff of the Legion of Mary, a Roman Catholic organisation, and Fr. R.S. Devane worked to close down the brothels. They received the co-operation of Dublin Police Commissioner, General William W.R.E. Murphy, and the campaign ended with 120 arrests and the closure of the brothels following a police raid on 12 March 1925, its financial viability having already been seriously undermined by the withdrawal of soldiers from the city following the Anglo-Irish Treaty (December 1921) and the establishment of the Irish Free State (6 December 1922)."
    Last edited by Prickly; 08-04-15 at 04:59. Reason: 'cause...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prickly View Post
    Revisionist history or accurate interpretation?

    According to Wikipedia there was 1600 prostitutes working in Monto alone. The attitudes never change though.

    "Monto was the nickname for the one-time red light district in Dublin, the capital of Ireland. Monto was roughly the area bounded by Talbot Street, Amiens Street, Gardiner Street and Seán McDermott Street (formerly Gloucester Street). The name is derived from Montgomery Street (now called Foley Street), which runs parallel to the lower end of Talbot Street towards what is now Connolly Station.[1] It was immortalised as "Nighttown" in the "Circe" chapter of James Joyce's famous work, Ulysses, where the central protagonists Leopold Bloom and Stephen Dedalus together visit a brothel.[1]

    In its heyday from the 1860s - 1920s, there were anything up to 1,600 prostitutes working there at any one time, with all classes of customers catered for. It was reputed to be the biggest red light district in Europe at the time. Its financial viability was aided by the number of British Army barracks and hence soldiers in the city, notably the Royal Barracks (later Collins Barracks and now one of the locations of Ireland's National Museum).[1]

    Monto was also a hive of IRA activity, particularly around the time of the war of independence, with several safe houses for the flying columns which included Phil Shanahan's public house.

    The then Prince of Wales, Prince Albert Edward (later King Edward VII), according to popular legend, lost his virginity there. In the 1880s the Prince, accompanied by his wife Alexandra and their son Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence strolled unrecognised through the area, having slipped away from their bodyguards and walked through Dublin.

    Between 1923 and 1925, religious missions led by Frank Duff of the Legion of Mary, a Roman Catholic organisation, and Fr. R.S. Devane worked to close down the brothels. They received the co-operation of Dublin Police Commissioner, General William W.R.E. Murphy, and the campaign ended with 120 arrests and the closure of the brothels following a police raid on 12 March 1925, its financial viability having already been seriously undermined by the withdrawal of soldiers from the city following the Anglo-Irish Treaty (December 1921) and the establishment of the Irish Free State (6 December 1922)."

    F**king c**ts,

    I hate the church.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bollocks View Post
    Do men need more extra marital sex now than in the past.

    I see that there were over 300 brothels in Ireland in the 1830's

    Its hadly a new phenomen

    But now much safer than ever in the past from a health point of view and from the prevention of pregnancy.

    Of course it is a convenient money earner, when there is a scarcity of decent jobs all over the world for young people.
    surprising that bollocks, were most working from home then you think

  10. #7
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    Dem british soldiers are to blame for everything.

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    Quote Originally Posted by philipkntz View Post
    Dem british soldiers are to blame for everything.
    At the time 1/2 and more of them were probably Irish (in the British army)

    At the time a number of women were working on the Curragh near the military base.

    They made their home in a patch of furze /gorse bushes and were I think called the "Curragh Wrens).
    Things have improved a little for both escort and client since then.

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    so no change there then


  13. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prickly View Post
    Revisionist history or accurate interpretation?

    According to Wikipedia there was 1600 prostitutes working in Monto alone. The attitudes never change though.

    "Monto was the nickname for the one-time red light district in Dublin, the capital of Ireland. Monto was roughly the area bounded by Talbot Street, Amiens Street, Gardiner Street and Seán McDermott Street (formerly Gloucester Street). The name is derived from Montgomery Street (now called Foley Street), which runs parallel to the lower end of Talbot Street towards what is now Connolly Station.[1] It was immortalised as "Nighttown" in the "Circe" chapter of James Joyce's famous work, Ulysses, where the central protagonists Leopold Bloom and Stephen Dedalus together visit a brothel.[1]

    In its heyday from the 1860s - 1920s, there were anything up to 1,600 prostitutes working there at any one time, with all classes of customers catered for. It was reputed to be the biggest red light district in Europe at the time. Its financial viability was aided by the number of British Army barracks and hence soldiers in the city, notably the Royal Barracks (later Collins Barracks and now one of the locations of Ireland's National Museum).[1]

    Monto was also a hive of IRA activity, particularly around the time of the war of independence, with several safe houses for the flying columns which included Phil Shanahan's public house.

    The then Prince of Wales, Prince Albert Edward (later King Edward VII), according to popular legend, lost his virginity there. In the 1880s the Prince, accompanied by his wife Alexandra and their son Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence strolled unrecognised through the area, having slipped away from their bodyguards and walked through Dublin.

    Between 1923 and 1925, religious missions led by Frank Duff of the Legion of Mary, a Roman Catholic organisation, and Fr. R.S. Devane worked to close down the brothels. They received the co-operation of Dublin Police Commissioner, General William W.R.E. Murphy, and the campaign ended with 120 arrests and the closure of the brothels following a police raid on 12 March 1925, its financial viability having already been seriously undermined by the withdrawal of soldiers from the city following the Anglo-Irish Treaty (December 1921) and the establishment of the Irish Free State (6 December 1922)."
    Monto (take her up to Monto).

    Song.

    Luke Kelly and the Dubliners.

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