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Thread: Cute Furry Animals/ Funny Animals and General Random Bullshit Thread etcetera.

  1. #1
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    Wink Cute Furry Animals/ Funny Animals and General Random Bullshit Thread etcetera.

    Its a fucking Hamster !

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    A "Dear John letter" is a letter written to a husband or boyfriend to inform him their relationship is over, usually because the author has found another lover. Dear John Letters are often written out of an inability or unwillingness to inform the man in person. The reverse situation, in which someone writes to his wife or girlfriend to break off the relationship, is referred to as a "Dear Jane letter."

    While the exact origins of the phrase are unknown, it is commonly believed to have been coined by Americans during World War II. Large numbers of American troops were stationed overseas for many months or years, and as time passed many of their wives or girlfriends decided to begin a relationship with a new man rather than wait for their old one to return.

    As letters to servicemen from wives or girlfriends back home would typically contain affectionate language (such as "Dear Johnny", "My dearest John", or simply "Darling"), a serviceman receiving a note beginning with a curt "Dear John" would instantly be aware of the letter's purpose.

    A writer in the Democrat and Chronicle of Rochester, NY, summed it up in August 1945:

    "Dear John," the letter began. "I have found someone else whom I think the world of. I think the only way out is for us to get a divorce," it said. They usually began like that, those letters that told of infidelity on the part of the wives of servicemen... The men called them "Dear Johns".

    There are a number of theories on why the name John is used rather than any other. John was a common name in America at the time the term was coined. John is also the name used in many other terms that refer to an anonymous man or men, such as "John Doe" or "John Smith".

    The phrase "that's all she wrote" is believed to have originated from Dear John letters. These letters would contain either the words "Dear John" and abruptly terminate, or only contain the words "Dear John, goodbye." The phrase "that's all she wrote" is used to indicate the end of story or an abrupt end of story, especially when the reader has a desire to know more, but the writer does not want to fulfill that desire.

    The book Dear John by Nicholas Sparks is about a man who is in the army. He falls in love while on leave. During war, he and his girlfriend write back and forth. Over time, they lose the relationship.

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    Unrequited love is love that is not openly reciprocated or understood as such, even though reciprocation is usually deeply desired. The beloved may or may not be aware of the admirer's deep affections. The Merriam Webster Online Dictionary defines unrequited as "not reciprocated or returned in kind."
    As the literary selections suggest, the inability to express and fulfill emotional needs may lead to feelings such as depression, low self-esteem, anxiety and rapid mood swings between depression and euphoria. A universal feeling, by some estimates affecting 98% of all people during their lifetimes, unrequited love has naturally been a frequent subject in popular culture.

    The object of unrequited love is often a friend or acquaintance, someone regularly encountered in the workplace, during the course of work or other activities involving large groups of people. This creates an awkward situation in which the admirer has difficulty in expressing his/her true feelings, as a romantic relationship may be inconsistent with the existing association; revelation of the lover's feelings might invite rejection, cause embarrassment or might end all access to the beloved.

    In terms of the feelings of the hopeful one, it could be said that they undergo about the same amount of pain as does someone who is going through the breakup of a romantic relationship without ever having had the benefit of being in that relationship. On the other hand, some research suggests that the object of unrequited affection experiences a variety of negative emotions, including anxiety, frustration and guilt.

    Unrequited love has long been depicted as noble, an unselfish and stoic willingness to accept suffering, though contemporary western culture may give greater weight to practical, goal-oriented and self-assertive behavior. Literary and artistic depictions of unrequited love may depend on assumptions of social distance which have less relevance in democratic societies with relatively high social mobility, or less rigid codes of sexual fidelity. Nonetheless, the literary record suggests a degree of euphoria in the limerence associated with unrequited love, which has the advantage as well of carrying none of the responsibilities of mutual relationships.

    Moreover, while it is not identical with puppy love, it can be associated with the underconfidence and emotional immaturity of extreme youth, as illustrated by its prominence as a theme in the work of Charles Schulz; his Peanuts character Charlie Brown suffers from unrequited love for the Little Red-Haired Girl, as does Peppermint Patty for Charlie Brown, Lucy van Pelt for Schroeder, Sally Brown for Linus van Pelt, and Linus for his teacher, Miss Othmar (and later a girl in his class, Lydia). Charlie Brown famously notes in one strip: "Nothing takes the taste out of peanut butter quite like unrequited love."[citation needed] According to Aron, Aron and Allen, "incidence of unreciprocated love greatest for those whose self-reported attachment style was anxious/ambivalent."

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    Do raccoons count as cute animals

    Last edited by aml; 26-07-10 at 22:03.
    I have lived a life of regrets.

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    Quote Originally Posted by aml View Post
    Do raccoons count as cute animals

    from this pic, yes

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    Join the E-I Fantasy Football League

    http://www.escort-ireland.com/boards...ntasy-Football

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    Last edited by texas; 01-08-10 at 13:59.

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    Aml and VJ offspring



    Aml in training to take on debest

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    aml (01-08-10), MILF Hunter (01-08-10), vampirejackie (01-08-10)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alana View Post

    Aml in training to take on debest
    go on Amy...you can do it


    Who do I trust? I trust me!


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