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Thread: Ambush Marketing

  1. #1
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    Default Ambush Marketing

    I am a little puzzled about the World Cup women who were arrested for wearing those orange dresses with some beer company logo at a match. What law was violated?

    Just because Budweiser (I think it is) are 'official' sponsors can they wield this kind of power. Sure, they can maybe dictate who gets turfed out of the stadium (a big maybe), but how does someone get put in jail because of this?

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    6 Prohibitions Regarding Ambush Marketing and Other Marketing Activities

    6.1 Ticket Holders may not engage in any form of activity which may result in an unauthorised commercial association with FIFA, the Event or parts of it to the detriment of FIFA or its commercial affiliates, whether by way of an unauthorised use of logos or otherwise ("Ambush Marketing").

    6.2 At the Stadia on Match days, Ticket Holders are strictly prohibited from using, wearing, possessing or holding promotional or commercial objects and materials, or offering to sell, selling or possessing with the intent to sell drinks, food, souvenirs, clothes, or other promotional and/or commercial items All such items may be removed or confiscated by the FIFA World Cup™ Authorities.

    6.3 Ticket Holders are strictly prohibited from providing any type of commercial service or undertaking any commercial promotions in the Stadium, unless expressly authorised by FIFA in writing.

    6.4 Ticket Holders are strictly prohibited from handing out pamphlets or information relating to, or in any way promoting or drawing attention to, any business, cause, charity or concern, whether commercial or not, in the Stadium, unless expressly authorised by FIFA in writing.

    6.5 Ticket Holders may not use a Ticket for commercial purposes, such as without limitation, for promotions or advertising activities, use as a prize in a competition or sweepstake.

    6.6 Tickets may not be sold, or otherwise included for commercial purposes as part of a travel package (for example combining Tickets with flights and/or a hotel room night) or as part of a hospitality package (for example combining Tickets with pre or post Match catering services in proximity to the Stadia), without the prior written approval of FIFA.

    FIFA.com

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    Thanks for that Alec but...

    this is the point I'm confused about - there's FIFA rules and there's South African law. Since when did FIFA become The Law in South Africa? Who's running the country?

    I mean if I go into Dunnes Stores wearing a t-shirt with a big Tesco logo, I might be asked to leave. But I can't be arrested for it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BootSlick55 View Post
    there's FIFA rules and there's South African law for it.
    Dead right and the South African law in question is the Contravention of Merchandise Marks Act.

    FIFA were jolly pleased to have that to back them up and this could be setting a precedent for future events.

    There is already some UK legislation aimed at this for the London Olympic Games and more is expected to be passed.

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    In theory you're not allowed to use public property to advertise something (substantial) either without paying, which is why you can't just set up in the middle of Grafton Street. If it's illegal on public property, I assume it is also illegal on another person's property UNLESS you have their explicit permission. For example tresspassing would be bad, tresspassing in the nude would be a worse crime.

    I agree though that the law should have nothing to do with it, they should have been told they can't advertise there and that was it.

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    one quick question here - does anyone actually know which dutch brewery was responsible for this stunt?
    Probably these guys: - Oranjeboom - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Not really a success if they wanted more publicity and they don`t even get their name mentioned

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    It was Bavaria wasn't it? Which is actually dutch.

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    It all seems to be further examples of corporations, quite literally, being the actual authors of legislation. Unfortunately seems that it's quickly becoming the norm. Industry insiders write the new laws for things they invent/bring to market, which governments pass as law, almost always unrevised and completely un-changed, just cemented into law, word-for-word.

    I knew a woman over in the U.S. I'd met nearly 10 years ago, she was a lawyer working as a consultant/liason between Google and the U.S. Govt. The project she was a part of was on writing/creating new laws about the internet and 'intellectual property' rights. It sounds like this stuff with the World Cup and London Olympic games are similar examples of industry writing their own laws and government giving it the rubber stamp. Corporate power un-checked and having (essentially) direct control over the law. Truly a sad thing.

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