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Thread: The Spice of Life

  1. #1
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    Love The Spice of Life

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    When out in a restaurant you'd think I would have learned not to order the spiciest thing on the menu by now after my mouth burning, forehead sweating and eyes running after eating, but there’s something about a chili pepper that I can’t resist.

    That something, it turns out, is capsaicin, a chemical compound produced by chilies to ward off unwanted consumers. The higher the concentration of capsaicin in a chili, the hotter it is.

    Capsaicin stimulates a type of cell that is responsible for transmitting touch, sound, light, taste, and other sensory stimuli to the brain. These cells, known as sensory neurons, receive information about their external environment via protein molecules called receptors. Receptors are the electronic keypads of the molecular world – they can only be activated or deactivated by specific hormones, drugs, or toxins containing the appropriate code.

    Capsaicin activates the same receptor that signals neurons to transmit information about heat and pain to your brain. When capsaicin activates this receptor, neurons send a message to your brain that your mouth is truly on fire, tricking your brain into thinking that your body temperature has skyrocketed and inducing unpleasant reactions such as sweating, flushing, running nose, and crying.

    Although capsaicin produces a burning, painful sensation when you bite into a chili, it also triggers the release of pleasure chemicals that make us feel exhilarated and euphoric. Once capsaicin activates the heat receptor, a chemical known as substance P transmits a pain message from the neurons to the brain. When the brain registers pain, it responds with a dose of self-medication: the release of endorphins.

    At the same time substance P is causing pain, it also rewards that pain by prompting release of dopamine, the chemical version of positive reinforcement. Besides chilies, certain foods, sex, and drugs can trigger the release of dopamine.

    As an orgasim releases dopamine, no wonder I'm addicted to sex, I better lay off those chillies!
    Put your hand on a hot stove for a minute and it seems like an hour. Sit with a pretty girl for an hour, and it seems like a minute

    Albert Einstein

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    irishdeltaforce (07-12-15)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kinkydub5 View Post
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Name:	sexy-chili-411x600.jpg 
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ID:	114383


    When out in a restaurant you'd think I would have learned not to order the spiciest thing on the menu by now after my mouth burning, forehead sweating and eyes running after eating, but there’s something about a chili pepper that I can’t resist.

    That something, it turns out, is capsaicin, a chemical compound produced by chilies to ward off unwanted consumers. The higher the concentration of capsaicin in a chili, the hotter it is.

    Capsaicin stimulates a type of cell that is responsible for transmitting touch, sound, light, taste, and other sensory stimuli to the brain. These cells, known as sensory neurons, receive information about their external environment via protein molecules called receptors. Receptors are the electronic keypads of the molecular world – they can only be activated or deactivated by specific hormones, drugs, or toxins containing the appropriate code.

    Capsaicin activates the same receptor that signals neurons to transmit information about heat and pain to your brain. When capsaicin activates this receptor, neurons send a message to your brain that your mouth is truly on fire, tricking your brain into thinking that your body temperature has skyrocketed and inducing unpleasant reactions such as sweating, flushing, running nose, and crying.

    Although capsaicin produces a burning, painful sensation when you bite into a chili, it also triggers the release of pleasure chemicals that make us feel exhilarated and euphoric. Once capsaicin activates the heat receptor, a chemical known as substance P transmits a pain message from the neurons to the brain. When the brain registers pain, it responds with a dose of self-medication: the release of endorphins.

    At the same time substance P is causing pain, it also rewards that pain by prompting release of dopamine, the chemical version of positive reinforcement. Besides chilies, certain foods, sex, and drugs can trigger the release of dopamine.

    As an orgasim releases dopamine, no wonder I'm addicted to sex, I better lay off those chillies!

    I love hot food especially Indian the hotter the better, Vindaloo, Phaal Curry (seriously hot) but delicious. And all natural not like Chinese food with all the chemicals added.
    Last edited by irishdeltaforce; 07-12-15 at 23:45.

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    Kinkydub5 (08-12-15)

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    Indian definitely much better than Chinese food. Hotter and as you said natural ingredients, so much more flavor in their dishes, that's if you can actually taste them if your mouth isn't burning!
    Put your hand on a hot stove for a minute and it seems like an hour. Sit with a pretty girl for an hour, and it seems like a minute

    Albert Einstein

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kinkydub5 View Post
    Indian definitely much better than Chinese food. Hotter and as you said natural ingredients, so much more flavor in their dishes, that's if you can actually taste them if your mouth isn't burning!
    Fork full of curry. then rice, drink a mouth full of water then beer, repeat same!

    Ask for a glass of milk if your a pussy!

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    Quote Originally Posted by irishdeltaforce View Post
    Fork full of curry. then rice, drink a mouth full of water then beer, repeat same!

    Ask for a glass of milk if your a pussy!
    Lol

    My strategy to eating an extremely hot dish is simply horsing the grub down as quick as possible so I don't have to take the pain anymore, even though I like the kick! Definitely a love/hate relationship with the pepper! Addictive I guess like many things in life ,I always say to myself never again but the next week I do the same thing
    Put your hand on a hot stove for a minute and it seems like an hour. Sit with a pretty girl for an hour, and it seems like a minute

    Albert Einstein

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kinkydub5 View Post
    Lol

    My strategy to eating an extremely hot dish is simply horsing the grub down as quick as possible so I don't have to take the pain anymore, even though I like the kick! Definitely a love/hate relationship with the pepper! Addictive I guess like many things in life ,I always say to myself never again but the next week I do the same thing
    Your my fucking hero dude!

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    Kinkydub5 (08-12-15)

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    Mexican is great for a kick!

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    I love spicy food and have a reasonably high tolerance, but my bro is a legend, nothing is too hot. No joke, sent his missus to A&E last time he cooked a curry

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