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Thread: Sex workers "feel safer" in Sweden.

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    Default Sex workers "feel safer" in Sweden.

    Is it just me or is this full of contradictions?

    http://www.irishtimes.com/news/socia...pert-1.2344599

    Kitty Holland. Topics: News, Social Affairs.
    First published:
    Tue, Sep 8, 2015, 16:29.

    Proposed legislation to criminalise the purchase of sex must also decriminalise prostitution, a Swedish expert on such legislation has said.

    Detective Inspector Kajsa Wahlberg, of the Swedish police’s anti-trafficking unit, also said it should be accompanied by “well funded” social supports for women and girls who want to exit the sex-industry, .

    Sweden introduced legislation in 1999 to criminalise the purchase of sex – a model campaigners would like to see emulated here. Key to the Swedish approach, said Det Insp Wahlberg, was that it had a gender-equality perspective first, rather than a criminal-justice one.


    ‘Every year Ruhama works with more than 300 women in Ireland whose lives have been seriously, and in some cases irreparably, damaged by prostitution.’ Photograph: Getty ImagesHead to head: Why the purchase of sex should be a criminal offence

    ‘Decriminalisation of both the purchasers of sex and the sex workers ensures an environment with better supports and protections for everyone.’ Photograph: Getty Images Head to head: Why the purchase of sex should not be a criminal offence

    Policy will also call on states to ensure that sex workers enjoy full and equal legal protection from exploitation. Photograph: Getty ImagesAmnesty votes to decriminalise sex work and prostitution

    “Prostitution is viewed as violence against women, and the majority of women in this world are hurt by it – physically and mentally.”

    Det Insp Wahlberg, who is also the Swedish government’s national rapporteur on combating trafficking, was in Dublin today to meet organisations campaigning for ’Swedish model’ legislation.

    Key to her country’s approach, she said, was that “it is not repressive”.

    “We ensure that the women in the sex industry are not criminalised and we support those who want to exit prostitution.”

    It was not illegal in Sweden for women to run a brothel together or to solicit on the streets, she said. It was illegal to ‘pimp’ or promote the prostitution of others however.

    Swedish police worked closely with social services, representatives of which always accompanied police on any raids on brothels.

    The Criminal Law (Sexual Offences) Bill is expected to be published in coming months. While it proposes to criminalise the purchase of sex it does not decriminalise soliciting in public, or sex work in brothels.

    Critics say this will leave women and girls vulnerable to prosecution. They also say the legislation could push the industry further underground.

    Detective Wahlberg said this should not happen as long as the gardaí are sufficiently resourced to enforce it.

    She said it was resource intensive legislation, requiring many man-hours to track, locate and prosecute illegal trafficking and management of prostitution.

    “It involves a lot of ‘listening in’ to conversations, translating. It is very resource intensive and very costly. Prostitution is already very ‘underground’. If law enforcers want to find it, that is their job. ”

    It was known, she said, that women felt safer in the sex industry in Sweden than they did elsewhere.

    “The men who purchase the sex want everything done very discreetly, so they do not cause trouble for the women, because they know if there is any trouble, the women can report the men without risking prosecution themselves.”

    There had been a substantial reduction in on-street prostitution since 1999, she said, but agreed this may have occurred anyway with the advent of the internet. The legislation had disrupted traffickers, however.

    Key, she said, was that the approach was women-centred.

    “We are not interested in prosecuting them. If women want to be in the ‘industry’ we will not disturb them.”

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    http://www.irishtimes.com/news/socia...pert-1.2344599

    From the Article
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    Detective Inspector Kajsa Wahlberg, of the Swedish police’s anti-trafficking unit, also said it should be accompanied by “well funded” social supports for women and girls who want to exit the sex-industry, .

    Det Insp Wahlberg, who is also the Swedish government’s national rapporteur on combating trafficking, was in Dublin today to meet organisations campaigning for ’Swedish model’ legislation.
    I have often wondered why (in Ireland) have persons and/or groups advocating Swedish-style Legislation in relation to the Sex Industry in Ireland only sought testimony from Swedish Police Officers, Swedish social workers etc in relation to the “effectiveness” of said Legislation.
    Equally, I have often wondered as to why persons and/or groups advocating Swedish-style Legislation have never sought testimony from Independent Sex Workers themselves as to how they would feel operating under such a Legislative model.

    Key to her country’s approach, she said, was that “it is not repressive”

    “We ensure that the women in the sex industry are not criminalised and we support those who want to exit prostitution.”
    There is an abundance of evidence to prove beyond any doubt that Swedish-style Legislation poses severe negative implications for those whom it supposedly serves to protect (namely Sex Workers).

    It was known, she said, that women felt safer in the sex industry in Sweden than they did elsewhere.
    Why then, in States where Swedish-style Legislation is being (or has been) considered have Independent Sex Workers spoken against (and protested against) the introduction of Swedish-style Legislation?

    Also, if Sweden is effectively “the safest country in the world to be a Sex Worker”, why are Sex Workers not choosing Sweden over any other country in which to work?
    (A reminder of what Swedish Sex Workers actually think of Swedish-style Legislation http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7D7nOh57-I8)

    “The men who purchase the sex want everything done very discreetly, so they do not cause trouble for the women, because they know if there is any trouble, the women can report the men without risking prosecution themselves.”
    Sex Workers themselves (in States where Swedish-style Legislation is implemented) do not wish to have their locations become (widely) known to the Police.

    One key reason for this is, if Police become aware of an Independent Sex Workers (working) premises, it is easy to find “criminals” to “arrest” (namely Sex Worker Clients) upon leaving premises.

    This in turn will lead to diminishment of said Sex Workers Client base (thus affecting the Sex Workers ability to earn a living).
    Odds against you?

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    I wonder how many women are rescued from abusive marriages each year? More than 300 maybe?

    One minute of research reveals that in Northern Ireland:

    Domestic violence statistics

    • Research shows that approximately 1 in 4 women have, or currently experience domestic violence.
    • Domestic violence accounts for approximately one-fifth of all recorded violent crime in Northern Ireland.
    • On average, there are five people killed each year as a result of domestic violence in Northern Ireland.
    • The police attend an average of 60 domestic-related incidents per day, but recognise that there is still a large amount of under-reporting of this type of crime.
    • On average, every week, the police attend over 400 domestic incidents and deal with over 100 domestic assaults.
    • UNICEF research released in 2006, showing per capita incidence, indicates that there are up to 32,000 children and young people living with domestic violence in Northern Ireland.
    • Over 30% of all domestic violence starts during pregnancy.
    • Since 1999, Women’s Aid across Northern Ireland gave refuge to 14,714 women and 14,356 children and young people.
    • During the last 16 years Women’s Aid Federation Northern Ireland managed 282,860 calls to the 24 Hour Domestic & Sexual Violence Helpline.
    • The government strategy Tackling Violence at Home estimates that the cost of domestic violence in Northern Ireland, including the potential loss of economic output, could amount to £180 million each year.


    Maybe that should be criminalizing relationships instead? 300 a year is nothing in comparison.
    Last edited by Curvaceous Kate; 14-09-15 at 07:39.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Equalizer

    http://www.irishtimes.com/news/socia...pert-1.2344599

    From the Article
    Comment

    ...................


    Key to her country’s approach, she said, was that “it is not repressive”

    “We ensure that the women in the sex industry are not criminalised and we support those who want to exit prostitution.”


    There is an abundance of evidence to prove beyond any doubt that Swedish-style Legislation poses severe negative implications for those whom it supposedly serves to protect (namely Sex Workers).
    I think therein lies the hypocrisy and discrimination , and the root of all evil .
    I do what I want. I cannot do otherwise.

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    Sex workers are no more fully decriminalised in Sweden than here! Also with the increasing stigmatization of sex work there, sex workers are perceived as essentially mentally ill and collaborators in their own oppression - Stockholm Syndrome! I have posted the video from the Swedish Crime programme where these nutter cops hang outside an escort's apartment, one where a punter has told them that the escort has been trafficked, they then proceed to collect slap on the wrist fines from punters while leaving her alone to be continually raped as a trafficked sex worker! That's how this type of law works! And TORLERS and cynical politicians know this damn well! Indeed the prospect of increased violence against sex workers, it has been said by a prominent supporter will have the benefit of dissuading women from entering the sex business! That's how sick this whole madness is turning out!
    Ride them on the beaches!

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