Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: 7 years a slave

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    557
    Reviews
    13

    Default 7 years a slave

    I wish our politicians would sort out problems like below and not keep saying trafficking is a sex trade only issue.


    Muhammad Younis grew up in a rural area of Pakistan. He has a wife and nine children. In 2002, Muhammad was recruited for a good job as a chef in a tandoori restaurant in Ireland. He was promised a work permit and decent pay. He took up the offer and moved thousands of miles away to support his wife and children back home, so they could have a better life at last.

    Instead of the promised good job, Muhammad endured 7 years of slavery. He worked 80 hours a week in the cramped, unventilated and overheated kitchen of a takeaway in Clondalkin. He was paid just 51 cents an hour for the first 3 years and given just one day off each year – Christmas Day.

    His passport was taken by his employer; he was constantly threatened and verbally abused. His every move was controlled; he was a virtual prisoner, shuttled between the kitchen and the small 2-bedroom house he shared with nine other workers. When his work permit ran out, the employer refused to renew it – to further control Muhammad, who was terrified of being deported. Muhammad was unable to reach out for help as he spoke only Urdu. He was completely isolated.

    After 2 years, Muhammad was vindicated: the Rights Commissioner awarded him €92,634.42 in unpaid wages and compensation. This award was upheld by the Labour Court.

    However, Muhammad’s employer brought the case to the High Court. He claimed he should not have to pay as Muhammad was undocumented and therefore the contract was illegal – so he should not have to honour it. Remember, it was the employer himself who had refused to renew Muhammad’s permit and had used Muhammad’s undocumented status to further isolate and threaten him. The judge ruled that as Muhammad did not have a valid work permit, he was not covered by employment legislation, and so he was not to receive a single cent in unpaid wages or compensation.

    Muhammad Younis was brought to Ireland for the express purpose of exploitation; he was a victim of trafficking for forced labour. For 7 years he endured slavery, abuse and isolation. After all that, he was left with nothing and his employer got off scot-free.

    In March 2012, having failed Muhammad Younis in every possible way, the Irish state informed Muhammed that it intended to deport him. Again with the help of MRCI, Muhammad appealed to the Minister for Justice and was granted Humanitarian Leave to Remain in Ireland.

    Further to this…

    The Migrant Rights Centre writes this morning:

    “The Supreme Court has OVERTURNED the High Court judgment and upheld the Labour Court award of €92,000 to Muhammad Younis! We are stunned, emotional and absolutely overjoyed for Muhammad. His strength and patience and perseverance have been vindicated in a unanimous judgment by the highest court in the land.”
    The
    http://www.broadsheet.ie/2015/06/25/...years-a-slave/

  2. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Zoidberg For This Useful Post:

    mexicanpete (26-06-15), nonpareil (26-06-15), robbie9 (26-06-15), SmallHorn (26-06-15), SteveB (26-06-15), tom sand (26-06-15)

  3. Default

    Why is the name of the take-away or the employer not reported????? Would anyone frequent a take-away staffed by slaves?

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to mexicanpete For This Useful Post:

    robbie9 (26-06-15), tom sand (26-06-15)

  5. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    557
    Reviews
    13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mexicanpete View Post
    Why is the name of the take-away or the employer not reported????? Would anyone frequent a take-away staffed by slaves?
    You would of thought they'd name it but it's probably something to do with the High Court not forcing them to pay his wages.

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    _______ !
    Posts
    4,045
    Reviews
    43

    Default

    51 cents an hour! He deserves 592,000 & a visa not 92,000!

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to robbie9 For This Useful Post:

    SmallHorn (26-06-15)

  8. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    6,424
    Reviews
    51

    Default

    Great to see the right decision was made in the end.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to SmallHorn For This Useful Post:

    robbie9 (26-06-15)

  10. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Eire.
    Posts
    8,325
    Reviews
    39

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mexicanpete View Post
    Why is the name of the take-away or the employer not reported????? Would anyone frequent a take-away staffed by slaves?
    You wouldn't see them as a slave presumably, just an Asian or whatever person in a uniform.
    I have sometimes wondered a little about some of those small takeaway places, not very busy looking , maybe 8 or 10 staff around at various times .Can they afford to pay minimum wage on top of rates , water charges, heating and light; raw material etc

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to nonpareil For This Useful Post:

    tom sand (26-06-15)

  12. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,630
    Reviews
    13

    Default

    This guy was treated appallingly by his employer (his cousin) who brought him over from Pakistan and then treated him like shit. His premises should have been boycotted and put out of business, and he jailed or deported.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •